Hygiene: The Kassel Clinic is operated on again


Surgery at the Kassel Clinic: Has the hygiene scandal been overcome?

After the scandal of contaminated surgical cutlery, operations at the Kassel Clinic are restricted again today. A handful of predictable measures are carried out with borrowed surgical instruments, said a spokeswoman for the hospital. Since the hygiene deficiencies in the surgical cutlery became known, the Kassel Clinic had canceled all planned operations and only performed emergency procedures. As of today, the first scheduled operations are being carried out again. According to the spokeswoman for the hospital, the fact that the operation of the operation cannot yet be fully resumed is due to the limited number of instruments available.

Operations with the help of borrowed instruments Since the central sterilization of the Kassel Clinic was closed immediately after the discovery of contaminated surgical cutlery, the clinic has since had to borrow surgical instruments from other houses or has been replaced by the manufacturers. With the help of these provided instruments, according to the clinic spokeswoman, the operation should gradually be normalized again. In the past few days, only around ten emergency operations were carried out per day, the clinic said. In order to return to normal operation, however, the central sterilization must be reopened quickly, since the borrowed surgical instruments are not sufficient in the long term. According to the "Gesundheit Nordhessen AG", to which the Kassel Clinic belongs, the company's own sterilization devices have already been checked and are working properly. So those responsible hope to be able to switch back to everyday life as quickly as possible.

Hessian hygiene regulation planned The accumulation of hygiene deficiencies in Hessian clinics - within a few weeks first in Fulda and then in Kassel - is not only a headache for the responsible clinic managers, but politicians are also forced to be more committed to hygiene in the Hessian clinics to care. The country's minister for social affairs, Stefan Grüttner (CDU), called for more intensive controls for hospitals and care facilities and for better training of specialist staff with regard to hygiene regulations. In terms of safety, "the clinics have to be checked more often," emphasized the minister of social affairs. Grüttner also announced the introduction of a hygiene regulation that the Greens have been calling for for a long time. In addition to the improved controls and the more intensive training of hygiene specialists in care and technology, the hygiene regulation will include regulations on the general hygiene structure in the Hessian clinics, said Grüttner.

Hygiene deficiencies lead to an increased number of infections The need for action exists, not only shows the current finds of contaminated surgical cutlery in Fulda and Kassel, but also the hospital infections, which are significantly higher in international comparison. According to the health authorities, significantly more people become infected during a hospital stay in Germany than, for example, in the Netherlands or the Scandinavian countries. According to the experts, the multi-resistant pathogens MRSA, which are immune to all common antibiotics, are a growing problem. For example, the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH) has repeatedly pointed out that hygiene deficiencies in hospitals in Germany are causing an increasing number of MRSA infections. According to DGKH expert Klaus-Dieter Zastrow, the introduction of a uniform hygiene regulation would be an important step in the right direction. (fp)

Also read:
Hessian hygiene regulation this year?
Hospital Kassel: surgical cutlery was sterile
Contaminated surgical cutlery in Hessen
Contaminated surgical cutlery at Fulda Clinic
Every tenth hospital treatment is harmful

Image: Martin Büdenbender / pixelio.de

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